A Thousand Boy Kisses by Tillie Cole

Narrator: Katie Schorr, P. J. Ochlan
two-stars
A Thousand Boy Kisses Book Cover A Thousand Boy Kisses
Tillie Cole
Romance; New Adult
March 15th, 2016
audiobook
316 pages

One kiss lasts a moment. But a thousand kisses can last a lifetime.One boy. One girl. A bond that is forged in an instant and cherished for a decade. A bond that neither time nor distance can break. A bond that will last forever. Or so they believe.When seventeen-year-old Rune Kristiansen returns from his native Norway to the sleepy town of Blossom Grove, Georgia, where he befriended Poppy Litchfield as a child, he has just one thing on his mind. Why did the girl who was one half of his soul, who promised to wait faithfully for his return, cut him off without a word of explanation?Rune's heart was broken two years ago when Poppy fell silent. When he discovers the truth, he finds that the greatest heartache is yet to come.

A stand-alone young adult tearjerker romance, recommended for ages fourteen and up.

This book is up as a finalist for the Best Young Adult Fiction in 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards. So I decided to listen to it as I already bought it a few months ago.
This was NOT a feel good story. Nor was it a happy ending in my opinion. It definitely a tear jerker for those who love a good messy cry.

From the beginning, this story was was overly dramatic and their actions didn’t feel like that of young children. Honestly, I didn’t shed a single tear. I felt bad because I know I should feel bad for the characters. But I didn’t truly connect or engage with this story. From the beginning, this story was overly dramatic and their actions didn’t feel like that of young children. I didn’t enjoy any aspects of this story unlike the other Tillie Cole books I’ve read.

First of all, the narration was just terrible. I often wondered if I would enjoy the book better if I had just read the kindle edition. Second, the character’s dialogues felt strange and weird for kids. Imagine a five-year-old Poppy talking about Norway and Vikings to eight-year-old Rune talking about infinity love. It felt odd that they wanted to spend every waking moment with each other and never with a single other friend even when they were teenager. Something about their interactions didn’t feel like normal and genuine representation of little kids. Kids often have a best friend, but not to where no one, nor family existed outside this person.

Second, I never felt like I knew the Poppy nor Rune. The author Tillie Cole didn’t develop the character and thus it didn’t allow me to really connect with them individually nor as a couple. Instead, we were told how thy just were so mushy about themselves without us seeing them evolve.

Third, Rune’s treatment of his parents, specifically his father was over the top and disrespectful. It showed such a spoiled and thoughtless young teenager and I never witnessed a remedial action towards his father for those behaviors. Also, Poppy’s secrecy was surprising considering the infinity connection she claimed she had with Rune. It also was just too contrived for me.

The big twist didn’t feel so twisty because I suspected it having read other YA books with similar twists. It didn’t endear the couple to me either but I do suspect touched all the readers that rates the book so high. Personally, the Fault in our Stars struck those emotional chords much stronger for me. It was definitely the writing in this story and that’s why I am glad I have read her other series and know that Tillie Cole can deliver compelling stories.

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