Slave to the Rhythm by Jane Harvey-Berrick

 

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review.
This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

28964054Slave to the Rhythm by Jane Harvey-Berrick
Release Date: March 8, 2016
Pages: 291 • Format: eARC
Published By: Harvey-Berrick Publishing
Purchase Links:
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DANCE. Guns.
MUSIC. Bullets.
RHYTHM. Pain.

Music in my head, dance in my body, the rhythm of my heart.

How far can you fall in just one month? How quickly can the human spirit be broken? Where does evil hide in plain sight?

Ash wants to dance. Needs it. To leave behind a life of expectation and duty, to set his soul free.
But life is never that simple. Every step is a journey on a new road.

For every action, there is a reaction.

Every choice has a consequence.

And when you meet the wrong person, all bets are off.

Laney tolerates her limitations, pushing quietly at boundaries. But when Ash crashes into her world through rage and violence, it sets off a chain reaction that neither of them expected.

 

two-stars

Sighs, there was not one redeeming quality to this story. I had to exhale when this book ended. I did not enjoy anything except for Laney. She was resilient, and kindhearted. That’s about it. I loathe Ash. I couldn’t deal with his split personalities. I hated it. Either he was a victim or a super douche bag to Laney. I didn’t like that she put up with him when he decided to treat her wrong with his tantrums. My biggest issue with this story was the concept of the sex slave trade. I feel like it’s so overdone in the genre that if the author was going to do it that it should have been more realistic. I found it really hard to believe that it was happening that way the author portrayed it. Now I’m not saying it couldn’t be true but she didn’t make be believe it. The first half of the story is such a different tone from the ending. It didn’t mesh well with me.

I actually didn’t see any difference from Ash as the victim in this story different from the women in other stories just like that. All the author did was change the gender to me. He didn’t try to help himself enough for me. I think Ash accepted his life up until the point of meeting Laney. For me Laney’s disability didn’t add anything to the story. It didn’t make her better emotionally, or mentally. It seemed very filler-ish to me. I thank the author for creating a woman who is kind, and too trusting. Now I did question Laney’s judgement. My first reaction would have been to call the police, not drive this man cross country to my dad who is a police in another city. I think that’s where her naivety came into place. But this time that worked out for her. She found someone she to fall in love with. She decided to stay by his side through all his trauma, anger, frustration, and love. I did enjoy Ash in his element with dancing. I liked how he perceived the lyrics to certain songs. I also thought they whole telling his story was a great thing, not just for him but his friends that were in the same horror as him. I liked the writing of the story alot, but the execution did not work for me.

About Jane Harvey-Berrick

I love to write.

I was born on the 13th, which explains a lot.

I write every day and get twitchy on the days when I’m prevented from writing.

I live by the beach, so you’ll find a beach scene in all of my books sooner or later.

Hobbies include ogling hot surfers.

Writing is solitary but that doesn’t make it lonely. My FB and Goodreads friends are very important to me. My writing buddies are A. Meredith Walters and Devon Hartford—lovely, kind, generous people.

I carry a notebook EVERYWHERE. I never know when ideas will come to me. I even write notes to myself at night in the dark. Hopefully I can read the scrawl I’ve written in the morning.

There’s a little part of me in every book I write. The philosophy from ‘Playing in the Rain’ is that you have to make the most of the life you’re given—choose to be happy as much as you can and look for the positive. I don’t always make it, but I do try.

Out of Nowhere (In the Middle of Somewhere #2) by Roan Parrish

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review.
This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

OutOfNowhereLGOut of Nowhere by Roan Parrish
Series: In the Middle of Somewhere
Release Date: February 24, 2016
Pages: 274 • Format: eARC
Published By:  Dreamspinner Press
Purchase Links:
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The only thing in Colin Mulligan’s life that makes sense is taking cars apart and putting them back together. In the auto shop where he works with his father and brothers, he tries to get through the day without having a panic attack or flying into a rage. Drinking helps. So do running and lifting weights until he can hardly stand. But none of it can change the fact that he’s gay, a secret he has kept from everyone.

Rafael Guerrera has found ways to live with the past he’s ashamed of. He’s dedicated his life to social justice work and to helping youth who, like him, had very little growing up. He has no time for love. Hell, he barely has time for himself. Somehow, everything about miserable, self-destructive Colin cries out to him. But down that path lie the troubles Rafe has worked so hard to leave behind. And as their relationship intensifies, Rafe and Colin are forced to dredge up secrets that both men would prefer stay buried.

four-half-stars

“You,” he says, “are lying to yourself if you think you’re living in the world. You’re barely making it through. You know what you want but you’re too scared to go after it. You think being gay is what makes you weak?” He shakes his head, and there’s no pity in his face. “Living a lie when you don’t have to. Acting like you’re the only one affected by your decisions. Those are the things that make you weak. It’s just fear.”

Brace yourself, this book was so amazing. Roan Parrish is definitely a force to be reckoned with. Her words and her emotions are so visceral. I damn it felt gutted by the end of reading this book. I didn’t think after book one that I could have those emotions, but this book was 10 times worst on my heart. I love her writing so much. It’s so gritty, authentic and just reads beautifully. I get so much of what she was dictated that I read this in one sitting, and decided to read it again the next day just to make sure I wasn’t dreaming. She did write Colin’s story to real and it left my emotions eviscerated. Let’s be clear, I didn’t think no matter what Colin’s reasons were that I would be okay for his treatment of his brother. I’m so big on family, and as the oldest sibling, I couldn’t see myself treating either of my sisters like that. Colin had so much self hatred going on in his life it was look walking through fog when he decided to live his truth. Jeez, Roan writes the love interest so well. Rafe is another amazing character trying to work out his second chance life. I live for stories like this because it’s easily relate able to know someone like Colin & Rafe. They can be your brothers, friends, co-workers, spouses. It’s so easy for people to judge and spew their hate that they don’t have a clue what it’s like to put themselves out there.

That vulnerable look that says, This is how you hurt me. Go ahead, it’s easy. And I want to punish him for being so weak. So easy to hurt. For being such easy prey that he turns me into a predator by default.

The imperfection of Colin & Rafe makes this book so great. Rafe is trying to turn his life around. He’s trying for his sobriety, his livelihood, and his relationship to Colin. Colin is such a ball of contridiction. When he’s first introduced in book one, he was just mean. I didn’t like him at all. I never thought that I’d be rooting for him by the end. Him as a person was so broken, devastated and destroyed. He yearn to live up to this character of being the perfect son. I don’t actually think he realized that his father wasn’t looking for that. Reading this was heartbreaking because Colin was trying to be the best possible him, but constantly living in fear, and all this hate about himself. The first initial meeting of Rafe & Colin was Colin being a douche. Colin hating Daniel for living in his truth, for Daniel just doing what he wanted without the ramifications that Colin assumed there would be. It’s hard too say what I want without spoiling it, but I hated his father. Okay that’s not fair, but I hated how his children felt like they needed to be in order to be loved. I noticed the same thing with Daniel, Colin was so use to being by himself outside his family. I don’t think he knew how to love, or why people fall in love. I loved the patient side of Rafe. I loved everything about Rafe. His social justice ideals, and give back to the community. I loved the center with the kids. This book taught about the prison system and decarceration. I never really thought of that before, but she definitely opened my eyes on the subject. I could go on and on with how much I love this, but I feel like when you finish this book you’ll be in love the same way I am. Thank you Roan for giving me these characters.

I think sometimes the people we get angriest with are the ones who have the things we want the most.”

About Roan Parrish

ROAN PARRISH is currently wandering between Philadelphia and New Orleans. When not writing, she can usually be found cutting her friends’ hair, meandering through whatever city she’s in while listening to torch songs and melodic death metal, or cooking overly elaborate meals. She loves bonfires, winter beaches, minor chord harmonies, and self-tattooing. One time she may or may not have baked a six-layer chocolate cake and then thrown it out the window in a fit of pique.